Thanet RNLI Community Safety

Out for a coastal or beach walk during half-term? Learn how to Be Coast Safe

The Isle of Thanet coast has some of the most beautiful beaches and coastline in the UK which draws visitors at all times of the year (nineteen miles of coastline in fact).  Exploring the coastline on foot is an excellent way of enjoying valuable time with family and friends, whilst grabbing fresh air, exercise and at the same time relaxing.  Holiday times are great occasions to get out and enjoy the coast.

Read More

Sign-Up To Our Lifesaving Newsletter?

Unfortunately, due to safety restrictions placed upon us due to the COVID-19 pandemic we have had to postpone many of our drowning prevention initiatives and lifesaving activity. However, we are still busy sharing key safety messages via social media and are permitted to carry out some ‘social distanced’ activity although on a limited basis.  We are continuing to keep subscribers up to date with all the latest news with an e-newsletter which is delivered straight to your inbox.

Read More

Open Water Swimming – Discover how to keep safe whilst enjoying your swimming

Open Water Swimming in lakes, rivers and at the coast has really taken off in the last few years  (particularly during the last year and in lockdown) and it is one of the largest growing sports in the UK. Swimmers tell us that it can significantly boost their mental wellbeing, fitness levels, mood, it’s highly invigorating, improves circulation and immune systems.

Read More

Follow Thanet RNLI Community Safety on our Social Media Channels

You can keep up to date with the Thanet RNLI Community Safety team on all the popular social networking sites including Twitter, Facebook and Instagram !

News stories and communications about our events and activities as well as safety advice are posted to these social networks virtually every day….so it is worth following us.  Due to COVID-19 safety protocols our team have not been able to hold any public facing community engagements. Therefore we have tried our best to share as much as possible across our social media channels.

Read More

Working together with partner agencies to help reduce drownings

Our team are passionately committed to reducing drowning and sharing water safety messages to all communities far and wide.  Working inconjunction with partner agenices and community groups the spread of the messages is much wider and more powerful.  For example we enjoy working with local businesses, local charities, Kent Fire and Rescue Service, Kent Police, Kent Search and Rescue, Community Wardens, Community Pastors and HM Coastguard to promote water safety at events to name a few.

socialmedia drowningprevention watersafety RNLI Communitysafety

If you are a regular follower of our social media channels and preventative work you will have seen that we are actively involved in supporting other water safety organisations campaigns to help prevent and reduce drownings. Here is a run down on the campaigns we get involved in:

 

Respect the water is the RNLI water safety campaign which runs throughout the year, but is relaunched during May to highlight water safety risks, how to avoid them and gives advice on how to stay safe. More information on Respect the Water campaign

 

‘Be Beach Safe’

During Summer 2020, the RNLI in collaboration with the HM Coastguard ran the ‘Be Beach Safe’ campaign, designed to share key beach safety messages.  Due to the travel restrictions imposed during lock-down the coast and beach saw a significant increase in visitor numbers. The ‘Be Beach Safe’ campaign was even more important during this period and continues to be shared far and wide.

 

Also, during the Summer of 2020, the RNLI initiated an Ambassador scheme, where organisations and businesses close to the coastline could sign-up and help share key water safety messages.  This also included calling the Coastguard via ‘999’ for any coastal emergency and displaying posters in their premises or venues.  During the 2020/21 the RNLI partnered with the HM Coastguard to share the Be Coast Safe safety message.  This is increasingly important during the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown that this message is shared as widely as possible with an increase in the number of people taking their daily exercise at the coast.

Coastguard Lifeboat RNLI CommunitySafety Thanet saving lives at sea
HM Coastguard and RNLI Community Safety sharing Don’t Drink and Drown safety messages with Margate bars 2018

What is the Don’t Drink and Drown campaign?

The Royal Lifesaving Society’s (RLSS) Don’t Drink and Drown campaign is run during September and December targeting University students and those enjoying their works Christmas parties. The Don’t Drink and Drown campaign highlights the dangers of walking home close to open water after a night out.  More information on the Don’t Drink and Drown campaign

runnersandwalkers rlss

Are Runners and Walkers at risk of drowning?

In 2019, our team were involved in promoting the Royal Lifesaving Society (RLSS) Runners and Walkers water safety campaign at the beginning of November by holding a water safety stand at the fabulous Pegwell Bay Park Run.  You may have come across the NFCC water safety campaigns called ‘Be Water Aware’. More information on this campaign

swim safe margate communitysafety
Swim Safe team pictured with the Margate Mayor Mick Tomlinson and Councillor Liz Hurst

What is Swim Safe?

For the past two years we have helped raise funds and promote the Swim Safe programme which comprises free sea swimming and safety lessons for children aged 7-14 years held on Margate main sands. More information on Swim Safe

 

What is the Know Who To Call campaign?

Throughout the year we help promote the work of the HM Coastguard more specifically the ‘Know Who To call’ in a coastal emergency campaign. This is a vitally important message to get across as over half the people we speak with at events don’t know to call the Coastguard via ‘999’ for any emergency at the coast or on the River Thames.

bewateraware NFCC watersafety

‘Be Water Aware’ – who has pioneered this campaign?

The National Fire Chief’s Drowning Prevention Week campaign is supported annually by the team. This campaign aims to raise awareness of the risk of accidental drowning using Fire and Rescue Services’ across the UK. More information on the ‘Be Water Aware’ campaign.

If you want to get involved in the RNLI Local Ambassador campaign then check out this link for more information. 

Thank you for reading this blog and we stay safe!

 

More useful links

RLSS – water safety campaigns

National Fire Chief’s – ‘Be Water Aware’

Nationalfirechiefs bewareaware drowning RLSS NFCC

Acknowledgements

RNLI

HM Coastguard

NFCC

RLSS

Do You Know What To Do If You Saw Someone Drowning?

Knowing what to do in the event of seeing someone in difficulty in the water could help save someone’s life. The majority of people will not just stand and watch someone in difficulty in the water. However, if your instinct is to jump in and attempt a rescue this could cost you your life.  On a lifeguarded beach the best action is to alert the lifeguards straight away. But, what happen’s if the incident is out of season when the beach doesn’t have lifeguards on duty or you are on holiday and you spot someone who is in difficulty in the water?

 

During August 2019 a gentlemen very tragically lost his life in Porthmadog, North Wales after entering the water to try and save the life of his children. I am sure you will agree that we all admire the selflessness that drives people to risk their own lives to help others, however, the RNLI’s message is clear “Call for help rather than endanger your own life and the lives of others”.

Mike Dunn, Deputy Director of Education and Research at RLSS UK has provided the following guide

6 Steps To Saving A Life Without Risking Your Own

1. Keep Alert

Don’t expect a casualty to be shouting for help. They may be struggling to breathe, and drowning looks very different to how it is portrayed in the movies.

If you’re not sure, shout: ‘Do you need help?’ If they say yes or don’t answer at all, it’s time to act.

2. Resist the temptation

Don’t be tempted to go in. The water might be cold, which will limit your ability to swim. And whatever has caused the casualty to need help is likely to happen to you too. Cold water shock is a killer. Find out more about by watching this video featuring RNLI Ambassador Ant Middleton

3. Dial ‘999’ or ‘112’ straight away

Call the emergency services before you do anything else, so help will be on its way.

Or ask someone else to call while you try to help the casualty. If you’re alone without a phone, find someone who can call for help. Give the following information to the Coastguard Operator if at the coast. Ask for the Fire Service if inland:

  • Give your location.
  • Describe the problem.
  • Tell them the number of people in danger.
  • Give any additional information that may be useful such as any access issues or hazards.

4. Shout and Signal

From the shore you have a better view of the area than the casualty. Shout and encourage them to stay calm and float. Remind them to kick their legs gently. Once they’ve caught their breath they may be able to reach a lifering in the water, a jetty, or a shallower area of water.

5. Find a Rescue Aid

If there is a life ring, throw bag (filled with rope), or other public rescue aid equipment nearby, quickly read any instructions then throw it to the casualty. See our advice on how to use a throw bag or lifering.

 

Some parts of the country have rescue boards (pictured above) which contain rescue equipment either a throw bag or a reach pole secured by a digital combination lock. To access this equipment dial ‘999’ ask for the Coastguard at the coast or on the River Thames. For inland water ways (canals, rivers, lakes, loch’s, pools) ask for the Fire Service quoting the identifying number on the rescue board which will allow you access to the emergency equipment.

If there is no public rescue aid equipment, throw anything that will float.

6.  Safe Rescue

Before you pull the casualty in, get down on one knee or lie down so you don’t fall in.

Remember, even if your rescue attempts fail, emergency services are on their way. Keep sight of the casualty to help the emergency services locate them quicker.

Picture Credits:  RNLI/Andy Perryman

More useful links:

It’s hot out there – what to do if you get into difficulty

Can I suffer from Cold Water Shock