Thanet RNLI Community Safety

Speedboat hits seawall!

On Thursday 12th July, at around 2.25pm HM Coastguard was alerted to an incident whereby two men had been thrown from a speedboat which then continued and hit the seawall at Minnis Bay, Margate. RNLI Lifeguards, Margate Inshore Lifeboat, Coastguard Rescue Team and Kent Police were called to the scene.  Lifeguards rescued two men from the water who had been wearing lifejackets, but not a killcord.

Above: Kill cord switch in action – there are numerous ones on the market
Tony Evans, HM Coastguard Maritime Operations Specialist said:  ‘These two men have had a very lucky escape.  Although they were wearing lifejackets, it would appear that they had a kill cord on the engine but neither of them were wearing it.  With a busy beach nearby, the circumstances could have been very different, or indeed tragic, if the vessel had not crashed into the wall.’
What is a killcord?
As the name suggests, is designed to kill your engine in the event of you going overboard. All owners and drivers of open powerboats, personal watercraft and RIBs should ensure that if their boat is fitted with a kill switch and kill cord, it is correctly used. On a powerboat the kill cord should be attached securely around the thigh and on a personal watercraft it should be attached to the buoyancy aid.
→Attach your kill cord before the engine is started, but certainly before the boat is put in gear where safe to do so. Stop the engine before transferring the kill cord to another driver.
→Always check your kill cord works at the start of each day or session and remember to replace it when there are signs of ageing, or wear and tear or it starts to lose spiral tension. When replacing kill cords, buy the manufacturers genuine replacement kill cords.
→Do not leave kill cords out in the elements. Extremes of temperature and UV light will harm the kill cord in the long term.
More helpful advice on how to stay safe whilst at the coast
HM Coastguard blog on the Margate speedboat incident
Acknowledgements to HM Coastguard and the RYA for the use of photo’s and technical advice.
Lifejackets, useless unless worn!

 

This blog post is all about urging all water activity users to wear lifejackets or personal bouyancy aids.  You may have read about the rescue recently undertaken by Whitstable’s Inshore Lifeboat, with the help of Margate’s All Weather Lifeboat.  The full report of the rescue can be found by visiting Whitstable Station’s website page.

The two gentlemen who were rescued by the Inshore Lifeboat crew had been in the water for two and a half hours, hanging onto their up-turned craft. Luckily, the position of the dingy was easily found thanks to a passing yacht.  It is imperative to wear a lifejacket whenever you go out onto the water and carry a means of calling for help. You can find out all sorts of top-tips on how to look after your lifejacket by checking out one of our previous blog posts or going to the RNLI website.  RNLI Community Safety teams around the coast run lifejacket clinics, to check over jackets and to advise sailers/yatchtsmen/anglers on whether they need attention or maintenance.

If you are wondering whether your lifejacket is ok to use, then why not have a look at this top tips blog. If you are still unsure then pop our team a quick message and we will be happy to advise. In the case of the two gentlemen rescued recently, they were very lucky. On another day, with no passing craft and more severe weather conditions the outcome could have been a whole lot worse. So, if you are an angler, yachtsmen/women, sailer, kaycker, canoeist or fishermen please wear your lifejacket when you are on the water and carry a means of calling for help. You should be checking your lifejacket at least once a year, by following our top tips check list. If you are unsure there are a whole host of companies that will service your lifejacket for you.

More information on calling for help devices for kayckers

How to Call for Help

Float Not Swim – RNLI campaign

Cut off by the tide at Kingsgate Bay Broadstairs

Saturday (3rd February 2017), whilst the majority of Margate’s residents were sat down for lunch, out with their families, or contemplating a packed weekend of sport in front of the TV. The little grey box attached to the town’s RNLI crews trouser belts (electronic pager) sounded summoning them urgently to launch their inshore boat. The launch was at the request of the UK Coastguard to persons cut off by the tide at Kingsgate Bay.

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Three crew assembled at the station, one of whom was one of the station’s highly trained helmsmen (who commands the boat). Inaddition to the boat crew, three further crew were required to act as tractor driver and two launchers.

On this occasion the crew quickly launched and successfully carried out the rescue of two persons. A link to the Margate Lifeboat Press Officers report is included here.

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Please spread our ‘staying safe top tips’  for visiting the coast amongst your family, friends and work colleages 1). Check and double check the tides and weather forecast;  2). Tell someone where you are going and when you are going to return; 3). Take a fully charged mobile phone pr other ‘calling for help’ device with you and have it to close at hand to use in a waterproof case 4) Wear the correct kit for the activity. 5) If you see someone or an animal in difficulty in the sea dial ‘999’ and ask for the Coastguard  For further advice check out the RNLI’s website.

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Kingsgate Bay – One of Thanet’s tidal cut-off hotspots